the dos and don'ts of structuring a job ad.

29/12/2016 11:41:35

While the details in a job ad will differ for each role, there are some must-haves when it comes to accurately communicating what you’re looking for in a candidate. Here's how to write an ad that will attract the right talent. 

DO 
Use relevant and simple language that clearly details the features and benefits that will most appeal to your pre-determined ideal candidate.  

Your advert should include a:

• Headline – to grab attention and leave no confusion about what the role entails. 
• Introductory paragraph – to sell the positives of your organisation and the most attractive features of the role. The tone throughout should reflect the organisation’s brand identity.
• Subheading with bullet points – summarise the responsibilities and perks of the role.
• Duties – make sure the role’s duties are relevant and specific.
• Criteria and qualities – structured as a clear and concise checklist. 
• Benefits – highlight non-monetary benefits such as gym membership, discounts or free parking. Advertise salary, or the salary band, unless you have a particular reason not to include it.
• Link to your website and your career section if relevant. 

DON’T 
Discriminate against any group or individual in your advert. This discrimination can be direct or indirect, so it’s important for anyone involved in recruitment to be aware of anti-discrimination laws.

A job advert encompasses internet, radio and television announcements, and also includes notice boards, images or even handwritten notes. 

It is illegal to specify that people of one gender, age group, people with a disability, or of a particular sexual orientation, married, or those from a particular racial or religious group need not apply.

 Therefore you must not:
• Use job titles or descriptions which suggest an intention to discriminate, such as handyman, salesgirl, mature person, young and dynamic.
• Use images that only feature one gender. Equally, using images of employees from only one ethnic heritage is also not best practice. 
• Indirectly discriminate by including requirements that exclude a proportion of the population.

 For more information and best practice guidelines on recruitment and selection visit the Australian Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission website: www.hreoc.gov.au